The Titans (page 37, with art)

Chapter 1: The Early Gods

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Sappho 58 LP – Poetarum Lesbiorum Fragmenta, pp. 41-42, ed. E. Lobel and D. L. Page. Oxford 1955

Mimnermos 4 W – Iambi et Elegi Graeci 2, p. 84, ed. M. L. West. Oxford 1972

To Tithonos he gave to have an ugly unending

old age, which is even more chilling than grievous death. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

 

Hellanikos 4F140 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 140, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Servius, Scholia to Vergil, Georgics 3.328 – Servii Grammatici qui feruntur in Vergilii Bucolica et Georgica Commentarii, p. 302 , ed. G. Thilo. Leipzig 1887

Latin Text

Proklos, Argumentum of Aithiopis Poetae Epici Graeci 1, pp. 67-9, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987. 

Aischylos, Psychostasia, testimoniaTragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta 3, pp.  374-76, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1985.

Rome, Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia: Ionian hydria (Ricci Hydria) with Eos and Thetis supplicating Zeus, and their sons Achilleus and Memnon

flickr photo

flickr photo

L. D. Caskey and J. D. Beazley, Attic Vase Paintings in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, vol. 3 (1963), 45 no. 1

Paris, Musée du Louvre G115: Attic red-figure cup by Douris with Eos and dead Memnon

Wikimedia photo

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Perseus Art and Archaeology Artifact Browser

Louvre

Pherekydes 3F73 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 80, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

ApB 1.4.4 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

And Dawn fell in love with Orion and carried him off and brought him to Delos; for Aphrodite caused Dawn to be perpetually in love, because she had bedded with Ares. Greek Text

Homer, Iliad 23.226

But at the hour when the star of morning goeth forth to herald light over the face of the earth—the star after which followeth saffron-robed Dawn and spreadeth over the sea. Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 381

And after these Erigeneia bare the star Eosphorus (Dawn-bringer). Greek Text

ApB 1.7.4 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

Alcyone was married by Ceyx, son of Lucifer. Greek Text

ΣAb Iliad 9.562 – Scholia Graeca in Homeri Iliadem 3, pp. 412-13, ed. W. Dindorf and E. Maass. Oxford 1877.

Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 404-9

Again, Phoebe came to the desired embrace of Coeus. Then the goddess through the love of the god conceived and brought forth dark-gowned Leto, always mild, kind to men and to the deathless gods, mild from the beginning, gentlest in all Olympus. Also she bore Asteria of happy name. Greek Text

Aischylos, Eumenides 4-8

And in the third allotment, with Themis’ consent and not by force, another Titan, child of Earth, Phoebe, took her seat here. She gave it as a birthday gift to Phoebus, who has his name from Phoebe. Leaving the lake and ridge of Delos, he landed on Pallas’ ship-frequented shores. Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 406-8

and brought forth dark-gowned Leto, always mild, kind to men and to the deathless gods, mild from the beginning, gentlest in all OlympusGreek Text

Hesiod Theogony 918-20

And Leto was joined in love with Zeus who holds the aegis, and bore Apollo and Artemis delighting in arrows, children lovely above all the sons of Heaven. Greek Text

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Tags:

#Tithonos

#Eos

#Memnon

#Achilleus

#Thetis

#Leto

Artistic sources edited by Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, January 2018

Literary sources edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, July 2020

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