R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, 6 vol.

R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, 6 vol., ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1985.

New Translations

Volume 1. Göttingen 1971

Phrynichos, Alkestis fr 3 Sn – p. 73 

Orcus carrying a sword with which to cut off Alcestis’ hair. (Transl. from Latin E. Bianchelli)   EGM pp. 5, 195

Volume 3: Aischylos. Göttingen 1985.

Aigyptioi fr 5 p. 125

Zagreus (= Hades) (Tranls. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 118

Argo fr 20 R – p. 135

Where is the holy wood of the Argo that speaks with a human voice?  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 343

Argo fr 20a R – p. 136

However Aeschylus and others say that a certain piece of speaking wood was hurled by Minerva to there (i.e. the place where the Argo was built).  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 343

Iphys fr 21R – p. 136

Iphys (=Tiphys)  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 343

Glaukoi 25b R – p. 142

Two Pans, one son of Zeus, the other son of Saturnus  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 110

Diktuourgoi fr 47a.18-20 R  p. 169

Yours [Zeus] was the greater blame, but mine the lasting pain. (Transl. Mary Emerson) EGM p. 301

Heliades fr 68 R p. 186

Then the rushing sound of the father Helios (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 31

Heliades fr 70 R p. 187

Zeus is the heaven, Zeus is earth, Zeus is sky,

Zeus therefore is all things, and what is above all of these things. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 31, 61 upper

 

Heliades fr 71 R p. 188

The Adriatic women will have a way of weeping (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 31

Kabeiroi fr 97a R – p. 216

Sophokles in his drama Lemniai (fr 385) and Aischylos in his Kabeiroi list all the people that entered the ship Argo.  (Transl. E Bianchelli).  EGM p. 344

Xantriai fr 170 R – p. 286

whom neither the rays of the sun look at

nor the bright eye of Leto’s daughter. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM pp. 35, 87 lower

Perrhaibides fr 184 R p. 300

Where are the many and choicest gits for me?

Where are the golden and silver cups? (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 719

Perrhaibides fr 186 R p. 301

He perished pitiably having been cheated of his property.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 719

Prometheus Lyomenos fr 201 R – p. 318

Dearest son of a most hateful father  (Transl. T. Gantz)  EGM p. 161

Sphinx fr 236 R p. 343

the Sphinx, the dog lord of the unlucky days (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 24

Phorkiades fr 262 I R pp. 362-363

It seems that [Perseus] also took the curved blade made of adamant from Hephaistos. As the tragic poet Aischylos says in his Phorkides, the Gorgons had the Graiai as their lookouts.  But they only had one eye between them and they handed it round to one another as each went on guard.  Perseus, having watched carefully, stole it as it was handed over and threw it into the Tritonian marsh.  Thus, coming upon the Gorgons who were fast asleep, he took Medusa’s head (transl. Mary Emerson).  EGM p. 306

Phorkiades fr 262 iv, v R p. 364

It seems that [Perseus] also took the curved blade made of adamant from Hephaistos. As the tragic poet Aischylos says in his Phorkides, the Gorgons had the Graiai as their lookouts. But they only had one eye between them and they handed it round to one another as each went on guard.  Perseus, having watched carefully, stole it as it was handed over and threw it into the Tritonian marsh.  Thus, coming upon the Gorgons who were fast asleep, he took Medusa’s head. (transl. Mary Emerson)   EGM p. 305, 306

fr 341 R p. 412

ivied Apollo, Bacchic seer (Transl. E Bianchelli)  EGM p. 118

fr 382 R p. 432

father Theoinos (God of wine), yoker of the Mainades (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 118, 142

fr 384 R p. 432

O Hermes, patron of athletic contests, son of Maia and Zeus  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 111

Volume 4: Sophokles. Göttingen 1977.

Andromeda, p. 156 R apud Katast (Pseudo-Eratosthenes, Katasterismoi) 16 and 36, p. 156 (Mythographi Graeci vol. 3.1, ed. A. Olivieri [1897], pp. 20 and 42):

Of  Kassiepeia:  Sophocles the tragic poet tells in his Andromeda how this woman by quarrelling with the Nereides about her beauty, came to grief, in that Poseidon sent a monster to ravage the land.  For this reason, the daughter was offered to the monster.

Monster: This is what Poseidon sent to Kepheus because of Kassiepeia being angry with the Nereides about her beauty; but Perseus killed it, and because of this was placed in the stars as a memorial of his exploit.  Sophocles the tragic poet tells all this in his Andromeda. (Transl. Mary Emerson)  EGM p. 307 lower

Danae fr 165 – p. 174

I do not know your enterprise; one thing I know; if this boy is living, I perish.  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)   EGM p. 301

Iobates – p. 268 [The following is a translation of Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. A. Nauck [2nd ed. 1889], pp. 194-195]

We do not know the story of Sophokles’s play.  It could be that some comments in Schol. AB Il. Z 155 are relevant here:  “Anteia, wife of Proitos, lusting for Bellerophon, demanded that he go to bed with her:  but he, having regard for decency, refused.  Anteia, was afraid that he would get in first with Proitos and denounce her lust, so she accused Bellerophon, claiming he had forced himself upon her.  Proitos did not want to kill Bellerophon with his own hand, so he sent him to Lykia, to his father-in-law, Iobates, bearing – unawares – written messages. Iobates tested him with many trials, and when he saw that he survived them all, he suspected that a terrible slander was being contrived against his guest – He then gave him his own daughter, Kasandra, in marriage, and a share of his kingdom. – The story is in the Tales from the Tragedies* of Asklepiades.

*Tragodioumena (Trans. Mary Emerson)   EGM p. 314

Kolchides fr 343 R p. 319

Sophokles says that they slaughtered the child (i.e. Apsyrtos) in Kolchis in the house of Aietes.   II  Sophokles in his Kolchides says that they slaughtered Apsyrtos in the house of Aietes (follows in the Skythai etc. [see F 546])  (Transl. E. Bianchelli) EGM p. 363

Lemniai fr 385 R  p. 337

Sophokles in his drama Lemniai (and Aischylos in his Kabeiroi list all the people that entered the ship Argo.  (Transl. E Bianchelli).  EGM p. 344

Skythai fr 547R p. 417

(The Argonauts) did not sail through Tanais, but made the same journey as before, as Sophokles states in the Skythai and Kallimakos (fr. 9 Pfeiffer).  (Transl. E. Bianchelli). EGM p. 362

Tereus fr 585 R – p. 440

[It is] clearly painful, Prokne, but nevertheless there is need for mortals to contentedly bear divine things. (Transl. Aaron J. Ivey)  EGM p. 240

Tereus, fr 586 R p. 440

she hastens, and in her many-colored robe (transl. Aaron J. Ivey)  EGM p. 241

Tereus, fr 595 R p. 444

the shuttle’s voice (transl. Aaron J. Ivey)  EGM p. 241

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