The Trojan Kings (page 561 upper)

Chapter 16, The Trojan War

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Lykophron, Alexandra  1301-8

to be the bride of Asteros, the lord of Crete. Nor were they contended when they had taken like for like; but sent Teucer and his Draucian father Scamandrus a raping army to the dwelling-place of the Bebryces to war with mice; of the seed of those men Dardanus begat the authors of my race, when he married the noble Cretan maiden Arisba.  Greek Text

Lykophron, Alexandra 29

the high Hill of Doom that was founded by the wandering cow  Greek Text

Scholia at Lykophron, Alexandra 29 – Lykophronis Alexandra 2, pp. 25-26, ed E. Scheer. Berlin 1908

Greek Text

ApB 3.12.3 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

But Ilus went to Phrygia, and finding games held there by the king, he was victorious in wrestling. As a prize he received fifty youths and as many maidens, and the king, in obedience to an oracle, gave him also a dappled cow and bade him found a city wherever the animal should lie down; so he followed the cow. And when she was come to what was called the hill of the Phrygian Ate, she lay down; there Ilus built a city and called it Ilium.  Greek Text

Konon 26F.1.12 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 194, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Homer, Iliad 13.459-61

In the end, he deemed it best to go and fetch Aeneas, whom he found standing in the rear, for he had long been aggrieved with Priam because in spite his brave deeds he did not give him his due share of honor.  Greek Text

Homer, Iliad 20.188-24

Have you forgotten how when you were alone I chased you from your herds helter-skelter down the slopes of Ida? You did not turn round to look behind you; you took refuge in Lyrnessos, but I attacked the city, and with the help of Athena and father Zeus I sacked it and carried its women into captivity, though Zeus and the other gods rescued you.  Greek Text

ApB 3.12.1-3 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

Electra, daughter of Atlas, had two sons, Iasion and Dardanus, by Zeus. Now Iasion loved Demeter, and in an attempt to defile the goddess he was killed by a thunderbolt. Grieved at his brother’s death, Dardanus left Samothrace and came to the opposite mainland. That country was ruled by a king, Teucer, son of the river Scamander and of a nymph Idaea, and the inhabitants of the country were called Teucrians after Teucer. Being welcomed by the king, and having received a share of the land and the king’s daughter Batia, he built a city Dardanus, and when Teucer died he called the whole country Dardania. And he had sons born to him, Ilus and Erichthonius, of whom Ilus died childless, and Erichthonius succeeded to the kingdom and marrying Astyoche, daughter of Simoeis, begat Tros. On succeeding to the kingdom, Tros called the country Troy after himself, and marrying Callirrhoe, daughter of Scamander, he begat a daughter Cleopatra, and sons, Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymede. This Ganymede, for the sake of his beauty, Zeus caught up on an eagle and appointed him cupbearer of the gods in heaven; and Assaracus had by his wife Hieromneme, daughter of Simoeis, a son Capys; and Capys had by his wife Themiste, daughter of Ilus, a son Anchises, whom Aphrodite met in love’s dalliance, and to whom she bore Aeneas and Lyrus, who died childless. But Ilus went to Phrygia, and finding games held there by the king, he was victorious in wrestling. As a prize he received fifty youths and as many maidens, and the king, in obedience to an oracle, gave him also a dappled cow and bade him found a city wherever the animal should lie down; so he followed the cow. And when she was come to what was called the hill of the Phrygian Ate, she lay down; there Ilus built a city and called it Ilium.  Greek Text

Vergil, Aeneid 3.163-68

A land there is, Hesperia call’d of old,
(The soil is fruitful, and the natives bold—
Th’ Oenotrians held it once,) by later fame
Now call’d Italia, from the leader’s name.
lasius there and Dardanus were born;
From thence we came, and thither must return.  Latin Text

Vergil, Aeneid 7.205-8

I call to mind (but time the tale has worn)
Th’ Arunci told, that Dardanus, tho’ born
On Latian plains, yet sought the Phrygian shore,
And SamothraciaSamos call’d before.  Latin Text

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2022

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