Gaia and Pontos (page 19, with art)

Chapter 1: The Early Gods

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Homer, Odyssey 1.241

But as it is, the spirits of the storm [the Harpuiai] have swept him away and left no tidings. Greek Text

Homer, Odyssey 14.371

But as it is the spirits of the storm [the Harpuiai] have swept him away, and left no tidings. Greek Text

Homer, Odyssey 20.77-78

Meanwhile the spirits of the storm [the Harpuiai] snatched away the maidens and gave them to the hateful Erinyes to deal with. Greek Text

Berlin, once Pergamon-Museum F1682 (lost):  Attic black-figure spouted bowl by the Nessos Painter with Harpuiai

Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum Berlin, Antiquarium vol. 1 (Deutschland vol. 2, 1938), pls. 46.1 and 47.2

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Hesiod, Theogony 270-336

And again, Ceto bore to Phorcys the fair-cheeked Graiae, sisters grey from their birth: and both deathless gods and men who walk on earth call them Graiae, Pemphredo well-clad, and saffron-robed Enyo, and the Gorgons who dwell beyond glorious Ocean in the frontier land towards Night where are the clear-voiced Hesperides, Sthenno, and Euryale, and Medusa who suffered a woeful fate: she was mortal, but the two were undying and grew not old. With her lay the Dark-haired One in a soft meadow amid spring flowers. And when Perseus cut off her head, there sprang forth great Chrysaor and the horse Pegasus who is so called because he was born near the springs of Ocean; and that other, because he held a golden blade in his hands. Now Pegasus flew away and left the earth, the mother of flocks, and came to the deathless gods: and he dwells in the house of Zeus and brings to wise Zeus the thunder and lightning. But Chrysaor was joined in love to Callirrhoe, the daughter of glorious Ocean, and begot three-headed Geryones. Him mighty Heracles slew in sea-girt Erythea by his shambling oxen on that day when he drove the wide-browed oxen to holy Tiryns, and had crossed the ford of Ocean and killed Orthus and Eurytion the herdsman in the dim stead out beyond glorious Ocean. And in a hollow cave she bore another monster, irresistible, in no wise like either to mortal men or to the undying gods, even the goddess fierce Echidna who is half a nymph with glancing eyes and fair cheeks, and half again a huge snake, great and awful, with speckled skin, eating raw flesh beneath the secret parts of the holy earth. And there she has a cave deep down under a hollow rock far from the deathless gods and mortal men. There, then, did the gods appoint her a glorious house to dwell in: and she keeps guard in Arima beneath the earth, grim Echidna, a nymph who dies not nor grows old all her days.  Continue   Greek Text

Homer, Odysssey 13.96

There is in the land of Ithaca a certain harbor of Phorcys, the old man of the sea. Greek Text

Homer, Odyssey 13.345

This is the harbor of Phorcys, the old man of the sea. Greek Text

Homer, Odyssey 1.72

even the godlike Polyphemus, whose might is greatest among all the Cyclopes; and the nymph Thoosa bore him, daughter of Phorcys who rules over the unresting sea. Greek Text

Alkman 1.19 PMG – Poetae Melici Graeci, p. 2, ed. D. L. Page. Oxford 1962.

Akousilaos 2F11 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1p. 51, ed. F. Jacoby. 2d ed. Leiden 1957. 

Hesiod, Theogony 270-73

And again, Ceto bore to Phorcys the fair-cheeked Graiae, sisters grey from their birth: and both deathless gods and men who walk on earth call them Graiae. Greek Text

Aischylos, Prometheus Desmotes (Prometheus Bound) 792-97

crossing the surging sea until you reach the Gorgonean plains of Cisthene, where the daughters of Phorcys dwell, ancient maids, three in number, shaped like swans, possessing one eye amongst them and a single tooth; neither does the sun with his beams look down upon them, nor ever the nightly moon. Greek Text

Aischylos, Phorkides fr 262 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta3, pp. 362-64, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1985.

Pherekydes 3F11 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1,pp. 61-62, ed. F. Jacoby. 2d ed. Leiden 1957. 

Pindar, Pythian 12.13

Yes, he [Perseus] brought darkness on the monstrous race of Phorcus. Greek Text

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Tags:

#Gaia

#Pontos

#Harpuiai

#Graiai

Artistic sources edited by Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, October 2017

Literary sources edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, University of Georgia, July 2020

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