P. 342

Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 38 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 26, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 40 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 26, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 150 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, pp. 73-75, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosphers, Epimenides 1.10.111

He [Epimenides] wrote a poem On the Birth of the Curetes and Corybantes and a Theogony, 5000 lines in all; another on the building of the Argo and Jason’s voyage to Colchis in 6500 lines.  Greek Text

Pindar, Pythian 10

Today you must stand beside a beloved man, Muse, the king of Cyrene with its fine horses, so that while Arcesilas celebrates his triumph you may swell the fair wind of song that is due to the children of Leto and to Pytho, where once the priestess seated beside the golden eagles of Zeus, [5] on a day when Apollo happened to be present, gave an oracle naming Battus as the colonizer of fruitful Libya, and telling how he would at once leave the holy island and found a city of fine chariots on a shining white breast of the earth, and carry out [10] in the seventeenth generation the word spoken at Thera by Medea, which once the inspired daughter of Aeetes, the queen of the Colchians, breathed forth from her immortal mouth. She spoke in this way to the heroes who sailed with the warrior Jason: “Hear me, sons of high-spirited men and of gods. For I say that from this wave-washed land one day the daughter of Epaphus [15] will have planted in her a root of cities that are  dear to men, in the temple of Zeus Ammon.  Continue Reading  Greek Text

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.8-14

And no long time after, in accordance with that true report, Jason crossed the stream of wintry Anaurus on foot, and saved one sandal from the mire, but the other he left in the depths held back by the flood. And straightway he came to Pelias to share the banquet which the king was offering to his father Poseidon and the rest of the gods, though he paid no honour to Pelasgian Hera.  Greek Text

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 3.66-73

Moreover Jason was greatly loved by me before, ever since at the mouth of Anaurus in flood, as I was making trial of men’s righteousness, he met me on his return from the chase; and all the mountains and long ridged peaks were sprinkled with snow, and from them the torrents rolling down were rushing with a roar. And he took pity on me in the likeness of an old crone, and raising me on his shoulders himself bore me through the headlong tide.  Greek Text

Scholion at Hesiod, Theogony 993 – Scholia vetera in Hesiodi Theogoniam, ed. L. Di Gregorio. Milan 1975.

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.12-14

And straightway he came to Pelias to share the banquet which the king was offering to his father Poseidon and the rest of the gods, though he paid no honour to Pelasgian Hera.  Greek Text

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 4.242-43

Swiftly the wind blew, as the goddess Hera planned, so that most quickly Aeaean Medea might reach the Pelasgian land, a bane to the house of Pelias.  Greek Text

Pherekydes 3F105 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 88, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Hyginus, Fabulae 12

PELIAS: An oracle bade Pelias, son of Cretheus and Tyro, sacrifice to Neptune, and told him his death was drawing near if a monocrepis, that is, a man wearing only one sandal, arrived. While he was making the yearly offerings to Neptune, Jason, son of Aeson, Pelias’ brother, himself eager to make sacrifice, lost his sandal as he was crossing the river Evenus, and in order to arrive promptly at the ceremonies, failed to recover it. When Pelias noticed this, remembering the warning of the oracle, he bade him procure from King Aeetes, his enemy, the golden fleece of the ram which Phrixus had dedicated to Mars at Colchis. Jason, calling together the leaders of the Greeks, set out for Colchis.  Latin Text

Hyginus, Fabulae 13

JUNO: When Juno, near the river Evenus, had changed her form to that of an old woman, and was waiting to test men’s minds to se if they would carry her across the river Evenus, no one offered till Jason, son of Aeson and Alcimede, took her across. But, angry at Pelias for failing to sacrifice to her, she caused Jason to leave one sandal in the mud.  Latin Text

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, March 2022.

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