P. 387

Kallimachos, Hymn to Artemis 3.107-9

Greek Text

ApB 2.5.3 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

As a third labour he ordered him to bring the Cerynitian hind alive to Mycenae. Greek Text

Euripides, Helen 381-83

and also the one whom Artemis once drove from her chorus, as a deer with horns of gold, the Titan girl, daughter of Merops, because of her loveliness. Greek Text

Euripides, Herakles Mainomenos (Hercules Furens) 375-79

And he slew that dappled deer with horns of gold, that preyed upon the country-folk, glorifying Artemis, huntress queen of Oenoe. Greek Text

Euripides, Temenidai fr 740 N²

Greek Text

Kallimachos, Hymn to Artemis 3.98-109

Greek Text

Diodoros Siculus 4.13.1

The next Command which Heracles received was the bringing back of the hart which had golden horns and excelled in swiftness of foot. In the performance of this Labour his sagacity stood him in not less stead than his strength of body. For some say that he captured it by the use of nets, others that he tracked it down and mastered it while it was asleep, and some that he wore it out by running it down. One thing is certain, that he accomplished this Labour by sagacity of mind, without the use of force and without running any perils. Greek Text

ApB 2.5.3 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

As a third labour he ordered him to bring the Cerynitian hind alive to Mycenae. Now the hind was at Oenoe; it had golden horns and was sacred to Artemis; so wishing neither to kill nor wound it, Hercules hunted it a whole year. But when, weary with the chase, the beast took refuge on the mountain called Artemisius, and thence passed to the river Ladon, Hercules shot it just as it was about to cross the stream, and catching it put it on his shoulders and hastened through Arcadia. But Artemis with Apollo met him, and would have wrested the hind from him, and rebuked him for attempting to kill her sacred animal. Howbeit, by pleading necessity and laying the blame on Eurystheus, he appeased the anger of the goddess and carried the beast alive to Mycenae. Greek Text

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2021

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