The Abduction of Helen (page 573, with art)

Chapter 16, The Trojan War

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Homer, Odyssey 4.12-14

for to Helen the gods vouchsafed issue no more after that she had at the first borne her lovely child, Hermione, who had the beauty of golden Aphrodite.  Greek Text

Kinaithon fr 3 PEG – Poetae Epici Graeci 1, p. 116, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 175 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 84, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

A Scholia at Homer, Iliad 3.175 – Scholia Graeca in Homeri Iliadem I, pp. 147-48, ed. W. Dindorf and E. Maass. Oxford 1875.

Greek Text

Dionysios Skytobrachion 32F11 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 246, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Greek Text

Scholia at Lykophron, Alexandra 851 – Lykophronis Alexandra, vol. 2, pp. 275-76, ed. E. Scheer. Berlin 1908.

Greek Text

Lykophron, Alexandra 134

nor thy love of Antheus  Greek Text

London, British Museum 1899.2-19.1: Late Geometric krater with Paris dragging Helen (?) onto a ship with rowers [for another possible interpretation, see page 265]

BritMusKraterParisHelenGenView

BritMusKraterParisHelenDet

British Museum

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art 27.116: Middle Corinthian column krater, Paris and Helen arriving at Troy, with Hektor present third from left

C. Alexander, “A Coronthian Krater,” Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, vol. 23 no. 2, February 1928, Fig. 1 p. 48.

Boston, Museum of Fine Art, 13.186: Attic red-figure skyphos by Makron, with (from left to right) Aineias, Paris dragging Helen with Eros above, Aphrodite and Peitho, and son of Helen and Menelaos under handle

Museum of Fine Arts

A. Furtwaengler and K. Reichhold, Griechische Vasenmalerei: Auswahl hervorragender Vasenbilder (Serie II, 1909) pl. 85

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Berlin, Antikensammlung F2291: Attic red figured cup by Makron with Judgment of Paris (Side A) and Abduction of Helen (Side B); latter with Paris dragging Helen, Aineias repelling Timandra (Helen’s sister), and Euopis informing Ikarios and Tyndareos of the abduction

E. Gerhard, Trinkschalen und Gefässe des Königlichen Museums zu Berlin: und anderer Sammlungen vol. 2 (1850), pls. 11-12

Antikensammlung

Perseus Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Homer, Odyssey 4.259-64

Then the other Trojan women wailed aloud, but my soul [260] was glad, for already my heart was turned to go back to my home, and I groaned for the blindness that Aphrodite gave me, when she led me thither from my dear native land, forsaking my child and my bridal chamber, and my husband, a man who lacked nothing, whether in wisdom or in comeliness.”  Greek Text

Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 176 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, pp. 84-85, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Stesichoros 223 – Poetae Melici Graeci, p. 120, ed. D. L. Page. Oxford 1962.

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Tags

#Paris

#Helen

#ship

#Hektor

#Aineias

#Eros

#Aphrodite

#Peitho

#Timandra

#Euopis

#Ikarios

#Tyndareos

Artistic sources edited by R. Ross Holloway, Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor Emeritus, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown Univ., and Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, September 2021

Literary sources edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2023

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