Leda (page 321)

Chapter 11: The Daughters of Thestios

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Hel 257-59 – Euripides, Helen

For no other woman, Hellene or barbarian, gives birth to a white vessel of chicks, in which they say Leda bore me to Zeus.  Greek Text

Hisokrates, Helen 10.59

and in the guise of a swan he took refuge in the bosom of Nemesis, and again in this form he espoused Leda.  Greek Text

Paus 3.16.1 – Pausanias, Description of Greece

Here has been hung from the roof an egg tied to ribands, and they say that it is the famous egg that legend says Leda brought forthGreek Text

Lyk 506-7 – Lykophron, Alexandra

those wolves whose head a cloven egg-shell covers  Greek Text

 DD 25 (26) – Loukianos, Dialogi Deorum (Dialogues of the Gods)

Each has his half egg-shell, with the star on top  Greek Text

Σ Od 11.298 – Scholia to Homer, Odyssey – Scholia Graeca in Homeris Odysseam 2, p. 150, ed. W. Dindorf. Oxford 1855. 

Greek Text

ApB 3.10.7 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

But Zeus in the form of a swan consorted with Leda, and on the same night Tyndareus cohabited with her; and she bore Pollux and Helen to Zeus, and Castor and Clytaemnestra to Tyndareus. But some say that Helen was a daughter of Nemesis and Zeus; for that she, flying from the arms of Zeus, changed herself into a goose, but Zeus in his turn took the likeness of a swan and so enjoyed her; and as the fruit of their loves she laid an egg, and a certain shepherd found it in the groves and brought and gave it to Leda; and she put it in a chest and kept it; and when Helen was hatched in due time, Leda brought her up as her own daughter.  Greek Text

Fab 77 – Hyginus, Fabulae

LEDA: Jupiter, changed into a swan, had intercourse with Leda near the river Eurotas, and from that embrace she bore Pollux and Helen; to Tyndareus she bore Castor and Clytemnestra.  Latin Text

Σ Aen 3.328 – Servius, Scholia at Virgil, Aeneid – Servii Grammatici qui feruntur in Vergilii Carmina commentarii: Aeneis, ed G. Thilo and H. Hagen, 1. I, p. 399. Leipzig 1881.

Latin Text

VM I 78 – Vatican Mythographer I – Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini tres Romae nuper reperti 1, p. 27, ed. G. H. Bode. Celle 1834.

Latin Text

VM III 3.6 – Vatican Mythographer I – Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini tres Romae nuper reperti 1, p. 163, ed. G. H. Bode. Celle 1834.

Latin Text

VM I 204 – Vatican Mythographer I – Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini tres Romae nuper reperti 1, p. 64, ed. G. H. Bode. Celle 1834.

Latin Text

Hes fr 23.10-12 MW – Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 13, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

ApB 3.10.6 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

also another daughter Phylonoe, whom Artemis made immortal.  Greek Text

Hes fr 176 MW – Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) – Fragmenta Hesiodea, pp. 84-85, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Stesichoros 223 PMG Poetae Melici Graeci, p. 120 ed. D. L. Page. Oxford 1962.

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Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, February 2024.

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