The Fall of Troy (page 657 upper, with art)

Chapter 16, The Trojan War

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Naples, Museo Nazionale 81669 (H2422): Attic red-figure hydria by Kleophrades Painter with Sack of Troy, including Priam seated on altar with body of Asyanax on his lap; Neoptolemos seizes Priam’s shoulder in preparation for slaying him; behind him, dead Trojan warrior; and Greek threatened by Trojan woman with pestle (for Kassandra and Aias from same vase, see Gantz page 655; and for rescue of Aithra, see Gantz page 658)

A. Furtwaengler and K. Reichhold, Griechische Vasenmalerei: Auswahl hervorragender Vasenbilder (Serie I, 1904), pl. 34 (detail)

Flickr

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Mykonos, Archaeological Museum 2240: Relief pithos with Menelaos threatening Helen while she exposes her breast (for pithos, see also Gantz p. 654)

Wikimedia

L. Llewellyn-Jones, Aphrodite’s Tortoise: The Veiled Woman of Ancient Greece (2003) fig. 27

Digital LIMC (no photo)

♦ Sparta, Archaeological Museum 1: grave relief with possible depictions of the wedding of Menelaos and Helen, and Menelaos threatening Helen

A.M. Harrison, The Face that Launched a Thousand Ships

Digital LIMC (no photos)

Chest of Kypselos from temple of Hera at Olympia (known through Pausanias’ description and modern reconstructions)

Pausanias Description of Greece 5.18.3:

Menelaus, wearing a breastplate and carrying a sword, is advancing to kill Helen, so it is plain that Troy has been captured (original Greek).

Detail of Menelaos threatening Helen with sword, from reconstruction of chest of Kypselos (lost monument once in temple of Hera, Olympia) by W. von Massow, “Die Kypseloslade,” Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung vol. 41 (1916), pl. 1.

Berlin, Antikensammlung F1685: Attic black-figure amphora: Side A, with Menelaos threatening Helen and Neoptolemos grasping Astyananax while advancing on Priam, who sits on altar; behind altar, dead Trojan and two female spectators. Side B, with female spectator; Achilleus pursuing Troilos, who is on horseback; under horses, dog and hydria; Polyxena fleeing

Side A, from A. MacKay, “The Force of Tradition in Early Greek Poetry and Painting,” Humanities Australia 10 (2019) p. 43 fig. 1a

Side A, from E. Gerhard, Etruskische und Kampanische Vasenbilder des Königlichen Museums zu Berlin (1843), pl. 21

Side B, from Antikensammlung

Side B, from E. Gerhard, Etruskische und Kampanische Vasenbilder des Königlichen Museums zu Berlin (1843), pl. 20

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum IV 741: Attic red-figure neck-amphora by Berlin Painter with Menelaos, having dropped his sword, pursuing Helen, who is running towards statue of youth (Apollo?) and tree

N. Austin, Helen of Troy and Her Shameless Phantom (2018), p. 75 fig. 3

A.L. Millin, Monumens antiques inédits ou nouvellement expliquées 2 (1806), pl. 39

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Naples, Museo Nazionale 126053: Attic red-figure neck-amphora by Berlin Painter with Menelaos (side A) dropping his sword as he pursues Helen (side B)

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Rome, Musei Capitolini 316: Tabula Iliaca Capitolina, Roman marble relief with Sack of Troy; detail of temple of Aphrodite and, to the left, Menelaos threatening Helen, whose drapery is slipping off (for the whole Tabula Iliaca Capitolina, see Gantz page 651; and for a detail of the rescue of Aithra, see Gantz page 658)

Detail from Th. Schreiber and W. C. F. Anderson [Editor], Atlas of classical antiquities (1895), pl. 93 (restoration)

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art 24.97.11: Tabula Iliaca, Roman marble relief with Sack of Troy; detail of temple of Aphrodite and, to the left, Menelaos threatening semi-nude Helen (for whole Tabula Iliaca, see Gantz page 651)

Metropolitan Museum 

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Tags:

#Priam

#Astyanax

#Neoptolemos

#Menelaos

#Helen

#Achilleus

#Troilos

#Polyxena

#statue

#Apollo

#temple

#Aphrodite

Artistic sources edited by Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, July 2022

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