MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea

MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, ed. R. Merkelbach and M.L. West. Oxford 1967.

New Translations

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 23 MW – p. 14

I know that Hesiod in the Catalogue of Women says that Iphigeneia did not die, and she is, by the will of Artemis, Hekate. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EMG p. 99 upper

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 37 MW – pp. 25-26

P.S.I. 1301

. . .] whose fame [. . .] difficult; but [the blameless prophet] alone re[ceived them]. And he acco[m]plished this, [. . .] holding the shameful bond [. . .] for she was courting his broth[er, the hero Bias,] and achieving a delightful marr[iage . . .] rolling cattle, and [received the girl as a blam]eless prize. And [pre]tty-haired Pero bore Tala[os . . .] son of Bias [. . .]

     And they [reached noble] Proi[to]s in Argos, where he bestowe[d] on them [. . .] st[o]ut Proitos [. . .] a share [. . .] and to horse-taming [Bi]as [and Melampous . . .] he healed with his prophecies, since [. . .] sent a madness on them, anger[ed . . .] This family [. . .] of Neleus [. . .]

     [. . .] but he r[emained] there [in spacious Iolkos] holding the scepter [of Pelias . . .] whom [. . .] bore [. . .] Alkestis [. . .] and pretty-haired M[edousa . . .] Pasidike [. . .] bore [. . .  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 43a MW –  pp. 27-31

P. Cairensis Instituti Francogallici 322 fr. B, C, F, A; P. Oxy. 2495 fr. 21, 25, 30; P. Berol. 7497; P. Oxy. 421

[. . .pre]tty-crowned Polymele. [Or like the daughter of] god[like Erysichthon . . .] of the [. . .] son of Triops, [Mestre of pretty locks,] who had the [s]parkles [of the Graces; and they called him Aithon by] n[a]m[e] because [a blazing, mighty] famine [. . . the tribes] of mortal humans [. . .] and all [. . . blazi]ng famine [. . . for m]ortal humans [. . .] kn[ow- . . . shre]wd counsel in their [h]earts [. . . of w]omen [. . .]

          [. . .] girl [. . . dece]ived, [thou]gh he was very thoughtful [. . . ] darting-eyed, be[autif]ul-cheeked gi[rl . . .] and m[ar]ry a spirit-fit bedmate [. . . prom]ise[d] countless marriage gifts [. . . h]undred [. . .] h[erd]s o[f] lowing cattle [. . .] of sheep [. . .] of goats [. . . acce]pted [. . .] in spirit [. . .]

          [. . .] and out [. . .] and when she [had been] released, she darted away [and went off] i[nto the palace of her father,] and presently th[ereafter] a woman [was born i]n [her father’s] halls; [and . . .] followe[d . . .] with the mother [. . .]

     [. . .] and wished to take the girl [o]f[f . . . And so]on [aft]er strife and q[uarreling] wi[t]h each other ca[me to] Sisyphos and Aithon becau[se o]f the slender-ankled [girl,] and [n]o mortal could give judgment; but [. . .] they [re]ferred and praised; and then she [r]eliably se[t] forth her judgment [for] them [. . . “wh]enever someone longs to to ta[ke] a t[hin]g instead of the price[, . . .] must certainly [. . . con]cerning the pr[ice . . .] honor [. . . f]or it is [not] to be exchang[ed, when he has given it back] at first.”

          [. . .] to her [. . .] mules’ [. . .] after the mules [. . .]

     [. . .] of the ble[s]sed [. . .] and he surpassed the minds and the hea[rts] of me[n, b]ut he knew not at all the mind of aegis-holding Zeus, how the family of the children of the Sky would not grant him that any seed from Mestra [be] left to Glaukos among humans. And gro[und]shaking Poseidon overpowered her then, carrying her far from her father over the wine-colored oce[an,] in i[s]land Kos, though she wa[s] shrewd; there she bore Eurypylos, leader of a great arm[y,] she bore a child Ko[. . ., who ha]d presumptuous strength. And his sons we[re] Chalkon and Antagoras. And for only a small reason the stout son of Zeus sacked his attractive city and ravaged his villages, as soo[n as] he s[ail]ed from Troy i[n] s[wift] ships[. . .] because [of] Laomedon’s [ho]rses; an[d in Phlegra] he sle[w] the arrogant Gigantes.

     [But Mestra, aba]ndoning Kos, [cross]ed to her ancestral land, to holy Athens’ hill [. . . w]hen she bore a child to lord Poseidon[. . .] tended her [grim]-fated father.

[. . .] daughter of the son of Pandion [. . . wh]om Pallas Athena taught her works [. . . -]ing, for she had understanding equal to the goddesses, [from whose very bo]dy and silvery clothing [. . .] and a pleasant form blew away; [now, Sisypho]s son of Aiolos tested [her] plans, drivi[ng] off the cattle; [but] he did [not] know the mind of aegis-holding [Zeus at all]; he came [see]king the wom[an with gifts] by the will of Ath[ena; but against this] cloudgathering Zeu[s shook] his immortal head so that [. . .] would not ever exist [. . .] of the son of Sisyphos.

     And she, mixi[ng] with Pose[idon in his] arms, [. . .] blameless Belle[rophontes] to Glaukos in [. . . .] outstanding in wor[th among hum]ans on the boundless e[arth. His fa]ther gave to him, even [. . .] Pegaso[s,] the swiftest [horse . . .] everywhere [. . .] with which [. . .] fire[-breathing Chimaira].

     And he married the [dear] dau[ghter of great-hearted Iobates,] the respected ki[ng . . .] chief [. . .] who bo[re . . .]   (Transl. Silvio Curtis)   EGM p. 23

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 129 MW – pp. 62-63

P. Oxy. 2487 fr. 1, ed. Lobel

. . . gave . . . [paid ba]ck a great harm. . . . then b[ore blam]eless Abas . . . in the lofty palace . . . [who] rivaled [the Oly]mpians [in sightliness;] . . . [fa]ther of men and gods . . . and to mount the same bed; [and she bore Proitos] and Akrisios the king.

[And the] father of [me]n an[d of go]ds s[ettled them: Akrisios] was k[i]ng in well-buil[t A]rgos . . . rugged . . . [Eury]dike . . . [o]f Lakedai[mo]n . . . [fair-]cheeked, well fur[nishe]d with wi[ts.

And she bore] f[a]ir-ankle[d Dana]e [in her h]a[lls, who bore Perseus, mi]g[ht]y in[st]ille[r] of fear. [But Proitos dwelt in Tiry]ns, a well-[b]ui[l]t city, [and he married the daughte]r of great-hearted [Apheida]s so[n] of Arkas, S[th]eneboi[a] of beau[tiful] locks. . . . cow-eyed Sthen[e]boia . . . mounting the same bed, [the daughter of gr]eat-h[e]arte[d Apheidas s]on of Arkas . . . s who knew [most b]eautiful works, [Lysippe and Iphi]noe and Iphianassa, . . . palace of their father . . .  (Tansl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 132 MW – pp. 64-64

Suda 12.307

The word is Hesiodic; for he says of the daughters of Proitos:

because of hateful lewdness [he/she] lost [his/her] tender bloom.  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 133 MW – p. 65

P. Oxy. 2488A

. . .] boundless earth, for he even poured down a dreadful itch on their heads; for a leprosy covered their whole body, and their tresses streamed off their scalps, and their beautiful heads were bare.  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 135 MW – pp. 65-66

P. Cair. 45624, ed. Edgar

. . . Abas; and he be[got a son,] Akrisios. . . . [Pe]rseus, whom . . . [in a che]st into the sea . . . [b]rought up for Zeus . . . gold . . . dear Perseus . . . [and from him and] Andromeda [daughter of] Kepheus [were born Alkaios] and [S]thenelos and the force [of Elektryon] . . . by the cattle . . . for [the Te]leboai . . . [A]mphitryon  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 180.12 MW – p. 86

…Pandion in the lofty houses…  (Transl. Aaron J. Ivey)  EGM p. 233

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 190 MW – pp. 90-91

P. Oxy. 2502, ed. Lobel

. . . they armed kindre[d] blood. [And after them in her hall]s the noble among women bore daughters, [Lysidike and Nikip]pe and Astydameia, [whom the sons of Perseus m]a[r]ied as wives; [Alkaios,] counselor equal [to a god] m[ade Astydameia his vigorous] bedfellow . . . [and the force of l]or[d Sthe]nelos [married Nikippe] . . . [Herakl]es’s [force] . . . he [or]dained labor[s] . . . [and o]n fastened [chariots] . . .   (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 191 MW – p. 91

Σ A Iliad 19.116

Some say Amphibia daughter of Pelops, and some Antibia daughter of Amphidamas; but Hesiod says Nikippe daughter of Pelops.  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 193 MW – p. 92

Alkmaon, s[hephe]rd [of] the army . . . the trailing-ro[bed] daughters of Kadmos . . . [was] astounded, seeing the body before . . . of sorrowful Oidipodes . . . beast . . . Danaan [warrior]s, servants of Are[s] . . . to Polyneikes . . . by Zeus’s divine . . .

. . . from deep-swirli[ng] Alpheios on [hor]ses and fast[ened] chariots [Elektryon brought Lysidike,] the gorgeous [daughter] of Pelops. [She bore him child]ren, mount[ing] the same bed: [Gorgophonos] the warrior and the spearman Per[i-] . . . and Nomios and Kelaineus [and] Am[phimachos] and [Deimachos] and Eurybios and famous E[pilaos. And them] the ship-famous Taphi[an]s sl[ew over roll]foot cattle, [sailing] in [s]hips over the s[ea’s] w[i]de back f[rom] the Echinai [islands; but Alkmene] alone was l[eft] as a joy to her pa[rents, dau]ght[er of Lysidike] and [of illustrious El]ektryon . . . to the b[lack-]cloud [son of] Kro[nos] . . .  (Silvio Curtis)

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 195 MW – pp. 93-96 

(partial)    Shield

. . . and the good son of Alkaios led them, exulting in his army. . .   (Transl. Silvio Curtis

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 223 MW – p. 111

Boutes was, they say, a son of Poseidon, as Hesiod states in the Catalogue. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 63

Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 224 MW – p. 111

Indeed Hesiod…made it so that Sikyon was Erechtheus’ son  (Transl. Aaron J. Ivey).  EMG p. 233

Megalai Ehoiai fr 262 MW – p. 128

In the Great Ehoiai Skylla is the daugther of Phorbas and Hekate. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 26

fr 280 MW – pp. 139-40

 P. Ibscher col. i

 “. . .] to [sl]ay me by force and with long spear, [but destroy]ing [Fate] and Leto’s [son] slew me. [But come,] t[ell me this thr]ough and through: [. . .] you went down [to the house of Aides . . .] tru[sty companio]n accompanied [. . .] why, as you ought [. . .?”

. . .] and [f]irst made [a]nswer: [“. . .] to the shepherd of the host [. . . go]ddess horrid Erinys, [Zeus-bor]n [Mel]eag[ros,] son of [quick-]witted Oineus, indeed I will tell [you] thi[s v]ery exactly[. . . .] illustrious Phersephoneia [. . .] thunder-joyful Z[eus,] and so he would betroth as br[i]de, by the laws of the [immor]tals[, . . .] they say that those [w]oo their gre[at-. . .] sisters, and marry them far [from] their own [parents . . .] he arises from the blessed to betroth for marriage [his own] full [s]ister; for [he says that] he himself is born nearer than great Aides to [Pherseph]one, daughter of pretty-haired Demeter; for he says that [he is] brother by the same father [. . .] Aides is her uncle; [and] he said that [this is w]hy he was going down to the misty gloom.”

[So he said;] and the son of Oineus shuddered as he heard the story, [and,] an[swe]ring [him,] he addressed him gently: [“Theseus,] counselor of the armored [Athen]ians[, . . .-]dameia was the prudent sp[ou]se [. . .] of [g]reat-spirited Peirithoos? [. . .”]  (Transl. Silvio Curtis)

fr 307 MW – p. 160

Paieon is different from Apollo, as Hesiod also asserts:

     If Phoibos Apollo saves from death

     or Paieon himself, who knows remedies of all kinds (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 96

 

fr 312 MW – p. 162

Hesiod says that of all birds, only the nightingale has little regard for sleep but lies awake forever. The swallow does not always lie awake and loses but half of its sleep. They pay this penalty because of the insolent incident that occurred at that unlawful banquet in Thrace. (Transl. Aaron J. Ivey).  EGM p. 239 lower

fr 389 MW – p. 185

Hesiod says that Ouranos is an Akmonides; Gaia bore Akmon, and Ouranos came from Akmon. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 12

 

 

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