Gaia and Ouranos (page 14)

Chapter 1: The Early Gods

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Hesiod, Theogony 472-73

and that retribution might overtake great, crafty Cronos for his own father and also for the children whom he had swallowed down. Greek Text

Hesiod, Works and Days 803-4

On a fifth day, they say, the Erinyes assisted at the birth of Horcus (Oath) whom Eris (Strife) bore to trouble the forsworn. Greek Text

Herakleitos 22B94 – Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker 1, p. 172, ed. H. Diels and W. Kranz. 6th ed. Berlin 1951.

In fact Helios will not exceed his measure. If he should, the Erinyes, helpers of Dike, would track him down. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Homer, Iliad 19.418

When he had thus spoken, the Erinyes checked his voice. Greek Text

Anonymous 965 PMG Poetae Melici Graeci, p. 516, ed. D. L. Page. Oxford 1962.

Stesichoros 217 PMG Poetae Melici Graeci, pp. 116-17, ed. D. L. Page. Oxford 1962.

Aischylos, Eumenides 264-68

But you must allow me in return to suck the red blood from your living limbs. May I feed on you—a gruesome drink!

I will wither you alive and drag you down, so that you pay atonement for your murdered mother’s agony. Greek Text

Aischylos, Eumenides 545-49

Therefore, let a man rightly put first in honor the reverence owed to his parents, and have regard for attentions paid to guests welcomed in his house. Greek Text

Aischylos, Agamemnon 1188-93

And so, gorged on human blood, so as to be the more emboldened, a revel-rout of kindred Furies haunts the house, hard to be drive away. Lodged within its halls they chant their chant, the primal sin; and, each in turn, they spurn with loathing a brother’s bed, for they bitterly spurn the one who defiled it. Greek Text

Aischylos, Agamemnon 744-49

Then, swerving from her course, she brought her marriage to a bitter end, sped on to the children of Priam under escort of Zeus, the warder of host and guest, ruining her sojourn and her companions, a vengeful Fury who brought tears to brides. Greek Text

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Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, University of Georgia, July 2020

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