R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, vol. 3

R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, vol. 3: Aischylos, Göttingen 1985.

New Translations

Aischylos, Amymone fr 13 R  p. 132

It is fated for me to marry, and for you to be married  (Transl. T. Gantz)  EGM p. 207

Aigyptioi fr 5 R p. 125

Zagreus (= Hades) (Tranls. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 118

Argo fr 20 R – p. 135

Where is the holy wood of the Argo that speaks with a human voice?  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 343

Argo fr 20a R – p. 136

However Aeschylus and others say that a certain piece of speaking wood was hurled by Minerva to there (i.e. the place where the Argo was built).  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 343

Iphys fr 21 R – p. 136

Iphys (=Tiphys)  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 343

Glaukoi 25b R – p. 142

Two Pans, one son of Zeus, the other son of Saturnus  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 110

Diktuourgoi fr 47a.18-20 R p. 169

Yours [Zeus] was the greater blame, but mine the lasting pain. (Transl. Mary Emerson) EGM p. 301

Heliades fr 68 R p. 186

Then the rushing sound of the father Helios (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 31

Heliades fr 70 R p. 187

Zeus is the heaven, Zeus is earth, Zeus is sky,

Zeus therefore is all things, and what is above all of these things. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 31, 61 upper

Heliades fr 71 R p. 188

The Adriatic women will have a way of weeping (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 31

Kabeiroi fr 97a R – p. 216

Sophokles in his drama Lemniai (fr 385) and Aischylos in his Kabeiroi list all the people that entered the ship Argo.  (Transl. E Bianchelli).  EGM p. 344

Kares fr 99 R pp. 219-20

(lines 10-14)

And I began from my greatest offspring, birthing Minos…[next] Rhadamanthys, who of my children is undying; but he does not live in my eyesight, and that which is not present does not hold pleasure for loved ones. (Transl. Nick Gardner)  EGM p. 259

Xantriai fr 170 R – p. 286

whom neither the rays of the sun look at

nor the bright eye of Leto’s daughter. (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM pp. 35, 87 lower

Hoplôn Krisis (Judgment of Arms) fr 174 R  p. 289

(to Thetis) leader of fifty Nereides girls  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 630

Hoplôn Krisis (Judgment of Arms) fr 175 R  p. 289

( to Odysseus) but Sisyphos came closer to Antikleia,

                         therefore to your mother, I say, who begot you  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 630

Perrhaibides fr 184 R p. 300

Where are the many and choicest gits for me?

Where are the golden and silver cups? (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 719

Perrhaibides fr 186 R p. 301

He perished pitiably having been cheated of his property.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 719

Prometheus Lyomenos fr 201 R – p. 318

Dearest son of a most hateful father  (Transl. T. Gantz)  EGM p. 161

Sphinx fr 236 R p. 343

the Sphinx, the dog lord of the unlucky days (Transl. E. Bianchelli)   EGM p. 24

Phorkides fr 262 I R pp. 362-363

It seems that [Perseus] also took the curved blade made of adamant from Hephaistos. As the tragic poet Aischylos says in his Phorkides, the Gorgons had the Graiai as their lookouts.  But they only had one eye between them and they handed it round to one another as each went on guard.  Perseus, having watched carefully, stole it as it was handed over and threw it into the Tritonian marsh.  Thus, coming upon the Gorgons who were fast asleep, he took Medusa’s head (Transl. Mary Emerson).  EGM p. 306

Phorkides fr 262 iv, v R p. 364

It seems that [Perseus] also took the curved blade made of adamant from Hephaistos. As the tragic poet Aischylos says in his Phorkides, the Gorgons had the Graiai as their lookouts. But they only had one eye between them and they handed it round to one another as each went on guard.  Perseus, having watched carefully, stole it as it was handed over and threw it into the Tritonian marsh.  Thus, coming upon the Gorgons who were fast asleep, he took Medusa’s head. (Transl. Mary Emerson)   EGM p. 305, 306

Oreituia fr. 281 R  pp. 378-79

Boreas: …For if I see some **ἑστιοῦκον** alone, after threading a furious flame-wreath [into it], I shall kindle the roof and burn it to cinders! As it is I have not yet sung the noble song (Transl. Aaron J. Ivey).   EGM pp. 47, 243

fr 341 R p. 412

ivied Apollo, Bacchic seer (Transl. E Bianchelli)  EGM p. 118

fr 382 R p. 432

father Theoinos (God of wine), yoker of the Mainades (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 118, 142

fr 384 R p. 432

O Hermes, patron of athletic contests, son of Maia and Zeus  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)  EGM p. 111

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