The Children of Athamas: Phrixos and Helle (page 183 lower)

Chapter 5: The Line of Deukalion

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Scholion at Pindar, Pythian 4.288a – Scholia vetera in Pindari carmina, Vol. 2, pp. 136-37, ed. A.B Drachman. Leipzig 1903.

Greek Text

Pseudo-Eratosthenes, Katasterismoi 19 – Mythographi Graeci vol. 3.1, p. 23, ed. A. Olivieri. Leipzig 1897  =  ♠ Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 68 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 43, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.  =  Pherekydes 3F99 Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 87, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Greek Text

Pindar, Pythian 4.68

I will offer him, and the all-golden fleece of the ram, to the Muses as a theme for song.  Greek Text

Pyndar, Pythian 4.159-62

For Phrixus asks us to bring his soul home, going to the halls of Aeetes, and to recover the deep-fleeced hide of the ram, on which he was once saved from the sea and from the impious weapons of his stepmother.  Greek Text

Euripides, Phrixos B Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, pp. 626-32, ed. A. Nauck, 2nd ed. Leipzig 1889.

Greek Text

Hyginus, Fabulae 3

PHRIXUS: While Phrixus and Helle under madness sent by Liber were wandering in a forest, Nebula their mother is said to have come there bringing a gilded ram, offspring of Neptune and Theophane. She bade her children to mount it, and journey to Colchis to King Aeetes, son of Sol, and there sacrifice the ram to Mars. This they were said to have done, but when they had mounted, and the ram had carried them over the sea, Helle fell from the ram; from this sea was called Hellespont. Phrixus, however, was carried to Colchis Colchis, where, as his mother had bidden, he sacrificed the ram, and placed its gilded fleece in the temple of Mars — the very fleece which, guarded by a dragon, it is said Jason, son of Aeson and Alcimede, came to secure. But Aeetes gladly welcomed Phrixus, and gave him his daughter Chalciope in marriage. She later bore him children, but Aeetes feared that they would drive him from his kingdom, because he had been warned by prodigies to beware of death at the hands of a foreigner, a son of Aeolus. Therefore he killed Phrixus. But Phrixus’ sons — Argus, Melas, and Cylindrus — took ship to go to their grandfather Athamas. They were shipwrecked, however, and Jason, on his trip for the fleece, rescued them from the island of Dia, and took them back to their mother Chalciope. By her favour he was recommended to her sister Medea.  Latin Text

Hesiod, Aigimios fr 299 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 154, ed.  Merkelbach and M.L. West. Oxford 1967. 

Hesiod, Megalai Ehoiai (Great Catalogue of Women) fr 254 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 124, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Scholion at Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautica 2.178: Hesiod in the Great Catalogue of Women says that Phineus was disabled because he showed the way to Phrixos, and in the third Catalogue, because he chose a long life over eyesight.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Hesiod, Megalai Ehoiai (Great Catalogue of Women) fr 255 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 124, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Pherekydes 3F106 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 88, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957

Scholion at Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautica 1.4: Apollonios calls the ship Argo from Argos who had built it; Pherekydes from Argos son of Phrixos.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Hesiod fr 254 MW – See above

Akousilaos 2F38 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 56, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Pherekydes 3F25 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 68, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 2.1147-56

And him [ Phrixus] did Aeetes receive in his palace, and with gladness of heart gave him his daughter Chalciope in marriage without gifts of wooing. From those two are we sprung. But Phrixus died at last, an aged man, in the home of Aeetes; and we, giving heed to our father’s behests, are journeying to Orehomenus to take the possessions of Athamas. And if thou dost desire to learn our names, this is Cytissorus, this Phrontis, and this Melas, and me ye may call Argus.  Greek Text

Herodoros 31F39 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 223, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957

Scholion at Apollonios of Rhodes,  Argonautika 2. 1122  Argos spoke first]  one of the children of Phrixus. Herodoros says that they had been born by Chalkiope daughter of Aietes.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Pherekydes 3F101 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 87, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Epimenides 3B12 – Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker vol. 1, p. 35, ed. H. Diels and W. Kranz. 6th ed. Berlin 1951.

Simonides 576 PMG – Poetae Melici Graeci, p. 296, ed. D. L. Page. Oxford 1962.

Akousilaos 2F37 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 56, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Scholion at Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 4.1147:  About the hide most say that it was golden. However Akousilaos in About the Genealogies says that it grew purple from the sea.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Hekatoios 1F17 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker, vol. 1, p. 10, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.256-57

Would that the dark wave, when the maiden Helle perished, had overwhelmed Phrixus too with the ram.  Greek Text

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, February 2022

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