The Descendants of Inachos (page 202 with art)

Chapter 6: Other Early Families

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Bak 19 – Bakchylides, Dithyrambs

There are countless paths of divine song for one who has received gifts from the Pierian Muses, [5] and upon whose songs the violet-eyed maidens, the garland-bearing Graces, cast honor. Now, much-praised Cean ingenuity, weave something new, in lovely, [10] prosperous Athens. It is fitting for you to travel the greatest road, since you have received an outstanding honor from Calliope. [15] … when the golden heifer, the rose-fingered daughter of Inachus, left Argos, land of horses, by the counsels of widely powerful, greatest Zeus? When Argus, [20] who could see all around with untiring eyes, was bidden by golden-robed Hera, the greatest queen, to guard the lovely-horned heifer, unresting and unsleeping; [25] and the son of Maia could not evade him, neither by shining day nor by sacred night. Did it then happen that … [30] the swift-footed messenger [of Zeus] then killed [the son of Earth] with mighty offspring … Argus? Or was it that … unutterable cares? [35] Or did the Pierian Muses bring about … rest from troubles … ? For me, the most secure [path?] is the one which … when she arrived at the flowery banks [40] of the Nile, [gadfly-driven] Io, bearing the child … Epaphus. There [she bore him?] … ruler over linen-robed … teeming with majestic … [45] and greatest … mortal … from this race Cadmus, son of Agenor, begat Semele in seven-gated Thebes, and she bore the rouser of Bacchants, [50] Dionysus, the … and [lord of] garland-[bearing] choruses.  Greek Text

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts 08.417: Attic red-figure hydria with Hermes with sword, Argos, Io as cow and Hera 

R. Engelmann, “Die Jo-Sage,” Jahrbuch des Kaiserlich Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts 18 (1903) 43 fig. 2

Beazley Archive Pottery Database (no illustration)

Museum of Fine Arts (with color photos)

L. D. Caskey, J. D. Beazley, Attic Vase Paintings in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston part 3 (1963), 49-51, no. 150

Sophokles, Inachos fr 270 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 258, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 284 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 263, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 272 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 259, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 281a R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 263, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 278 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 261, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 284 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 263, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 286 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 264, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 269a R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, pp. 248-51, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

same as

♠ POxy 2369 – Papyrus fragment from Oxyrhynchus, as published in the Oxyrhynchus Papyri series, Vol. XXIII (2354-2382). 1956.

Sophokles, Inachos fr 279 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta vol. 4, p. 262, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1977.

ApB 2.1.3 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

But Zeus ordered Hermes to steal the cow, and as Hermes could not do it secretly because Hierax had blabbed, he killed Argus by the cast of a stone; whence he was called ArgiphontesGreek Text

Σ PD 561 – Scholia to Aischylos, Prometheus Desmotes (Prometheus Bound) – The Older Scholia on the Prometheus bound, pp. 158-59, ed. C. J. Herington. Leiden 1972.

Hesiod, Ehoiai (Catalogue of Women) fr 138 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 67, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Pherekydes FGrH 3F21 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 67, ed. F. Jacoby. 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Greek Text

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Literary sources edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2024.

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