P. 343

Pindar, Pythian 4

Today you must stand beside a beloved man, Muse, the king of Cyrene with its fine horses, so that while Arcesilas celebrates his triumph you may swell the fair wind of song that is due to the children of Leto and to Pytho, where once the priestess seated beside the golden eagles of Zeus, [5] on a day when Apollo happened to be present, gave an oracle naming Battus as the colonizer of fruitful Libya, and telling how he would at once leave the holy island and found a city of fine chariots on a shining white breast of the earth, and carry out [10] in the seventeenth generation the word spoken at Thera by Medea, which once the inspired daughter of Aeetes, the queen of the Colchians, breathed forth from her immortal mouth. She spoke in this way to the heroes who sailed with the warrior Jason.  Continue Reading  Greek Text

Hyginus, De Astronomia 2.37

ARGO: Some have said this ship was called Argo in Greek on account of her speed, others because Argus was her inventor. Many have said she was the first ship on the sea, and for this reason especially was pictured in the stars. Pindar says she was built in the town of Magnesia called Demetrias.  Latin Text

Pherekydes 3F106 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 88, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Scholion at Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautica 1.4:  Apollonios calls the ship Argo from Argos who had built it; Pherekydes from Argos son of Phrixos.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Aischylos, Argo fr 20 R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta 3, p. 135, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1985.

Where is the holy wood of the Argo that speaks with a human voice?  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Aischylos, Argo fr 20a R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta 3, p. 136, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1985.

However Aeschylus and others say that a certain piece of speaking wood was hurled by Minerva to there (i.e. the place where the Argo was built).  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Pherekydes 3F111 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 89, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.111-12

She herself [Athena] too fashioned the swift ship; and with her Argus, son of Arestor, wrought it by her counsels.  Greek Text

ApB 1.9.16 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

Sent to fetch the fleece, Jason called in the help of Argus, son of Phrixus; and Argus, by Athena’s advice, built a ship of fifty oars named Argo after its builder; and at the prow Athena fitted in a speaking timber from the oak of Dodona.  Greek Text

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.524-27

And a strange cry did the harbour of Pagasae utter, yea and Pelian Argo herself, urging them to set forth. For in her a beam divine had been laid which Athena had brought from an oak of Dodona and fitted in the middle of the stem.  Greek Text

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 4.580-91

And straightway on a sudden there called to them in the midst of their course, speaking with a human voice, the beam of the hollow ship, which Athena had set in the centre of the stem, made of Dodonian oak. And deadly fear seized them as they heard the voice that told of the grievous wrath of Zeus. For it proclaimed that they should not escape the paths of an endless sea nor grievous tempests, unless Circe should purge away the guilt of the ruthless murder of Apsyrtus; and it bade Polydeuces and Castor pray to the immortal gods first to grant a path through the Ausonian sea where they should find Circe, daughter of Perse and Helios.  Greek Text

Pyndar, Pythian 4.171-83

Soon there came the three sons, untiring in battle, whom dark-eyed Alcmena and Leda bore to Zeus son of Cronus; and two high-haired men, sons of the earth-shaker, obeying their innate valor, one from Pylos and the other from the headland of Taenarus; you both achieved [175] noble fame, Euphemus and wide-ruling Periclymenus. And from Apollo the lyre-player came, the father of songs, much-praised Orpheus. And Hermes of the golden wand sent two sons to take part in the unabating toil, Echion and Erytus, bursting with youth. Swiftly [180] came those that dwell around the foothills of Mount Pangaeon, for with a smiling spirit their father Boreas, king of the winds, quickly and willingly equipped Zetes and Calais with purple wings bristling down their backs.  Greek Text

Pindar, Olympian 4.19-20

Perseverance is what puts men to the test, and what saved the son of Clymenus [20] from the contempt of the Lemnian women.  Greek Text

Pausanias, Description of Greece 9.37.1

For Orchomenus left no child, and so the kingdom devolved on Clymenus, son of Presbon, son of Phrixus. Sons were born to Clymenus; the eldest was Erginus.  Greek Text

Naupatkia fr 5 PEG – Poetae Epici Graeci 1, p. 124, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

Pherekydes 3F108 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 89, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Herodoros 31F44 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 224, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Eumelos, Scholion at Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 3.1372 – Scholia in Apollonium Rhodium vetera, p. 570, ed. C. Wendel. Berlin 1935

Greek Text

Pherekydes 3F107 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, pp. 88-9, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Aischylos, Iphys fr 21R – Tragicorum Graecorum Fragmenta 3, p. 136, ed. S. L. Radt. Göttingen 1985.

Iphys (=Tiphys)  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.400-401

and with one consent they entrusted Tiphys with guarding the helm of the well-stemmed ship.  Greek Text

Pherekydes 3F26 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 68, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Pherekydes 3F109 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 89, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Apollonios of Rhodes, Argonautika 1.640-48

Meantime from the ship the chiefs had sent Aethalides the swift herald, to whose care they entrusted their messages and the wand of Hermes, his sire, who had granted him a memory of all things, that never grew dim; and not even now, though he has entered the unspeakable whirlpools of Acheron, has forgetfulness swept over his soul, but its fixed doom is to be ever changing its abode; at one time to be numbered among the dwellers beneath the earth, at another to be in the light of the sun among living men.  Greek Text

Pherekydes 3F110 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, p. 89, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Hesiod, Wedding of Keyx frr 263-69 MW –Fragmenta Hesiodea, pp. 129-32, ed. R. Merkelbach and M. L. West. Oxford 1967.

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, March 2022.

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