P. 340

Homer, Odyssey 10.135-39

and we came to the isle of Aeaea, where dwelt fair-tressed Circe, a dread goddess of human speech, own sister to Aeetes of baneful mind; and both are sprung from Helius, who gives light to mortals, and from Perse, their mother, whom Oceanus begot.  Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 956-62

And Perseis, the daughter of Ocean, bore to unwearying Helios Circe and Aeetes the king. And Aeetes, the son of Helios who shows light to men, [960] took to wife fair-cheeked Idyia, daughter of Ocean the perfect stream, by the will of the gods: and she was subject to him in love through golden Aphrodite and bore him neat-ankled Medea.  Greek Text

Mimnermos 11 W – Iambi et Elegi Graeci 2, p. 86, ed. M. L. West. Oxford 1972

Mimnermos 11a W – Iambi et Elegi Graeci 2, p. 86, ed. M. L. West. Oxford 1972

Eumelos fr 3 PEG – Poetae Epici Graeci 1, pp. 109-10, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

ApB 1.7.4 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

Canace had by Poseidon Hopleus and Nireus and Epopeus and Aloeus and Triops.  Greek Text

Epimenides 3B13 Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, vol. 1, p. 35, ed. H. Diels and W. Kranz. 6th ed. Berlin 1951.

Hesiod, Megalai Ehoiai (Great Catalogue of Women) fr 255 MW – Fragmenta Hesiodea, p. 124, ed. R. Merkelbach and M.L. West. Oxford 1967. 

Epimenides 3B12 – Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, vol. 1, p. 35, ed. H. Diels and W. Kranz. 6th ed. Berlin 1951.

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, March 2022.

 603 total views,  1 views today