Labor X: The Cattle of Geryoneus (page 406, with art)

Chapter 13: Herakles

Previous Page    Table of Contents    Next Page

Olympia, Archaeological Museum B 1881: bronze shield-band relief with Herakles encircling neck of Nereus? in his arms; Herakles has quiver and bow on his back, and has laid aside his club (on the left); Nereus? (here called “Old Man of the Sea”) with fish tail and human torso, from whose head emerge flames and a snake 

E. Kunze, Archaische Schildbänder. Olympische Forschungen 2 (1950) pl. 54

Digital LIMC (no image)

Samos, Vathy Museum K2111: fragment of Attic black-figure neck amphora with Herakles encircling neck of Nereus in his arms (both characters named); snake rises from Nereus’ fish tail

J.D. Beazley, The Development of Attic Black-Figure (1986), pl. 16.3

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Taranto, Museo Archeologico 179196: fragments of Attic black-figure amphora by Exekias with Herakles in lionskin wrestling Triton with serpentine tail (both characters named)

Museo Archeologico

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art 06.1021.48: Attic black-figure hydria; on body, Herakles in lionskin wrestle with fish-tailed Triton while Nereus, in human form, watches; on shoulder, Achilleus pursues Troilos, who flees with two horses; Polyxena flees in front of Troilos; on the left, female spectator

Metropolitan Museum

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art 16.70: Attic black-figure hydria with  Herakles in lionskin wrestling with fish-tailed Triton, while human-formed Nereus observes from the left

NewYorkHerakles Triton2

Metropolitan Museum

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Athens, Acropolis Museum 35-36: archaic limestone pediment with Herakles wrestling Triton (on left), two lions bringing down bull (center), and Nereus? (on right)

NAM

Acropolis Museum

AthensAcropolispedimen Herakles

Grisel’s page, Herakles and Triton, who has human torso and serpentine tail

Detail of watercolor of Herakles and Triton group, by Émile Gilliéron, Metropolitan Museum of Art 19.195.5

Two lions and bull from center of pediment, Acropolis Museum

Getty Image of Nereus? with three winged human torsos and serpentine tails, holding water, thunderbolt and bird

Reconstruction of right group, from Wikimedia

Digital LIMC (no image)

Paris, Cabinet des Médailles 255:  Attic black-figure hydria with Herakles in lionskin wrestling human-formed Nereus in center, and fleeing Nereides on left and right, one with lion and other with panther; flames issuing from Nereus’ shoulders and the sea are rendered in dilute glaze 

E. Gerhard, Auserlesene Griechische Vasenbilder, hauptsächlich Etruskischen Fundorts (Band 2): Heroenbilder (1843) pl. 112

Wikimedia

Cabinet des Médailles

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Rome, Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia 106462: Attic red-figure cup by Oltos, with (center) Herakles wrestling with human-formed Nereus, who raises dolphin in left hand; on both sides, Nereides flee (all characters named)

Flickr

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Munich, Antike Kunstsammlungen 8762: Attic red-figure pelike by Myson with  (Side A) Herakles in lionskin with trident, overturning vases in sea (believed to allude to destruction of house of Nereus); and (Side B) angry wife or daughter of Nereus running toward Herakles with pestle

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

Paris, Musée de Louvre, G155: Attic red-figure cup fragment with beardless  Herakles in lionskin, destroying house of Nereus with trident (furniture and vases are shown), while human-formed Nereus supplicates him to stop

Annali dell’Istituto di Correspondenza Archeologica 1878, pl. E (A)

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Digital LIMC

ApB 2.5.11 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

And going on foot through Illyria and hastening to the river Eridanus he came to the nymphs, the daughters of Zeus and Themis. They revealed Nereus to him, and Hercules seized him while he slept, and though the god turned himself into all kinds of shapes, the hero bound him and did not release him till he had learned from him where were the apples and the Hesperides.  Greek Text

ApB 2.5.10 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

As a tenth labour he was ordered to fetch the kine of Geryon from Erythia. Now Erythia was an island near the ocean; it is now called Gadira. This island was inhabited by Geryon, son of Chrysaor by Callirrhoe, daughter of Ocean. He had the body of three men grown together and joined in one at the waist, but parted in three from the flanks and thighs. He owned red kine, of which Eurytion was the herdsman and Orthus, the two-headed hound, begotten by Typhon on Echidna, was the watchdog. So journeying through Europe to fetch the kine of Geryon he destroyed many wild beasts and set foot in Libya, and proceeding to Tartessus he erected as tokens of his journey two pillars over against each other at the boundaries of Europe and Libya. But being heated by the Sun on his journey, he bent his bow at the god, who in admiration of his hardihood, gave him a golden goblet in which he crossed the ocean. And having reached Erythia he lodged on Mount Abas. However the dog, perceiving him, rushed at him; but he smote it with his club, and when the herdsman Eurytion came to the help of the dog, Hercules killed him also. But Menoetes, who was there pasturing the kine of Hades, reported to Geryon what had occurred, and he, coming up with Hercules beside the river Anthemus, as he was driving away the kine, joined battle with him and was shot dead. And Hercules, embarking the kine in the goblet and sailing across to Tartessus, gave back the goblet to the Sun. Greek Text

Hekataios 1F26 – Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 1, pp. 13-14, ed. F. Jacoby, 2d ed. Leiden 1957.

Greek Text

Previous Page    Table of Contents    Next Page

Tags:

#Herakles, #Nereus, #Triton, #Nereides

Artistic sources edited by R. Ross Holloway, Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor Emeritus, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown Univ., and Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, January 2024

Literary sources edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2021

 1,051 total views,  1 views today