The Actors of the Iliad (page 610 upper)

Chapter 16, The Trojan War

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Homer, Iliad 24.496-97

nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare.  Greek Text

Homer, Iliad 24.249-51

Then called he aloud to his sons, chiding Helenus and Paris and goodly Agathon [250] and Pammon and Antiphonus and Polites, good at the war-cry, and Deiphobus and Hippothous and lordly Dius.  Greek Text

Kypria fr 31 PEG – Poetae Epici Graeci 1, p. 61, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

Paus. 10.26.1  But Lescheos (Il. parv. fr 22) and the epic poem Kypria say that Eurydike was the wife of Aineias.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

Little Iliad fr 22 PEG – Poetae Epici Graeci 1, p. 81, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

Paus. 10.26.1  About Kreousa they say how the mother of the gods and Aphrodite rescued her from slavery away from the Greeks; she was in fact Kreousa, wife of Aineias. But Lescheos and the epic poem Kypria (fr 31) say that Eurydike was the wife of Aineias.  (Transl. E. Bianchelli)

♠ Cicero, De Divinatione 1.20.40

Pausanias, Description of Greece 10.26.1

Above the women between Aethra and Nestor are other captive women, Clymene, Creusa, Aristomache and Xenodice. Now Stesichorus, in the Sack of Troy, includes Clymene in the number of the captives; and similarly, in the Returns, he speaks of Aristomache as the daughter of Priam and the wife of Critolaus, son of Hicetaon. But I know of no poet, and of no prose-writer, who makes mention of Xenodice. About Creusa the story is told that the mother of the gods and Aphrodite rescued her from slavery among the Greeks, as she was, of course, the wife of Aeneas. But Lescheos and the writer of the epic poem Cypria make Eurydice the wife of Aeneas.  Greek Text

Homer, Iliad 6.298-300

the doors were opened for them by fair-cheeked Theano, daughter of Cisseus, the wife of Antenor, tamer of horses; [300] for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene.  Greek Text

Homer, Iliad 11.223-24

and Cisseus reared him in his house while he was yet but a little child, even his mother’s father, that begat fair-cheeked Theano.  Greek Text

Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Retired Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2023

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