Adrastos, Eriphyle, and Amphiaraos (page 510 upper)

Chapter 14: Thebes

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ApB 3.6.1 – Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

At the sudden outcry Adrastus appeared and parted them, and remembering the words of a certain seer who told him to yoke his daughters in marriage to a boar and a lion, he accepted them both as bridegrooms, because they had on their shields, the one the forepart of a boar, and the other the forepart of a lion. Greek Text

Σ Pho 409 – Scholia to Euripides, Phoinissai (Phoenician Women)Scholia in Euripidem, ed. E. Schwartz, vol. 1, p. 297. Berlin 1887. 

Greek Text

ΣA Il 4.376 – Scholia A to Homer, IliadScholia Graeca in Homeri Iliadem I, pp. 188-89, ed. W. Dindorf and E. Maass. Oxford 1875.

Greek Text

St: Theb 1.390-497 – Statius, Thebais

Here first [Adrastos] has leisure to let his glance pass o’er the heroes’ dress and mighty weapons. On Polynices’ back he spies a lion flayed, all rought with uncombed mane, like to that one which in the Teumesian glades Amphitryon’s son laid low in his boyish years and clothed himself withal, before the battle with the monster of Cleonae. Tydeus’ broad shoulders the proud spoils of Calydon, grim with bristles and curved fang, strive to enfold. Aghast and motionless stands the old king at so dire an omen, calling to mind the divine oracles of Phoebus and the warning uttered from the inspired cell. Latin Text

Fab 69 – Hyginus, Fabulae

When the servants had reported to Adrastus that two youths in unusual garb had come — one wearing a boar’s skin, and the other a lion’s skin, then Adrastus, mindful of the oracle given him, bade them be brought in, and inquired why they had come to his kingdom thus apparelled. Polynices said that he had come from Thebes, and he was wearing the insignia of his race; Tydeus spoke too, saying that he was the son of Oineus and traced his descent from Calydon, and so he wore a boar skin to recall the Calydonian Boar. Then the king, mindful of the oracular reply, gave Argia, the older daughter to Polynices, from whom Thersander was born; Deipyla, the younger, he gave to Tydeus, and she became mother of Diomede who fought at Troy.  Latin Text

Σ Pho 409 – Scholia to Euripides, Phoinissai (Phoenician Women)Scholia in Euripidem, ed. E. Schwartz, vol. 1, p. 297. Berlin 1887. 

See above

Fab 69 – Hyginus, Fabulae

Polynices said that he had come from Thebes, and he was wearing the insignia of his race; Tydeus spoke too, saying that he was the son of Oineus and traced his descent from Calydon, and so he wore a boar skin to recall the Calydonian Boar. Latin Text

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Edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, March 2020

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