Page 155 (with art)

Chapter 4: Prometheus and the First Men

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Hesiod, Theogony 521-22

And ready-witted Prometheus he bound with inextricable bonds, cruel chains, and drove a shaft through his middle. Greek Text

Athens, National Archaeoloigcal Museum, 16384: Attic black-figure skyphos-krater by Nettos Painter, with Herakles, Prometheus and eagle

Image from Dan Hinman-Smith

Wikimedia

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Berlin, Antikensammlung F1722: Attic black-figure column krater with Herakles, Prometheus and eagle

Otto Jahn, Archäologische beiträge (1847), pl. 8

Beazley Archive Pottery Database

Vatican Museums, Museo Gregoriano Etrusco, 16592: Lakonian black-figure cup, with Atlas, eagle and Prometheus ?

Bible History Online

Vatican Museums

Hesiod, Theogony 523-25

and set on him a long-winged eagle, which used to eat his immortal liver; but by night the liver grew as much again everyway as the long-winged bird devoured in the whole day. Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 533

though he was angry, he ceased from the wrath which he had before. Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 527-28

and delivered the son of Iapetus from the cruel plague, and released him from his affliction.  Greek Text

Hesiod, Theogony 616

but of necessity strong bands confined him. Greek Text

 

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Artistic sources edited by R. Ross Holloway, Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor Emeritus, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown Univ., and Frances Van Keuren, Prof. Emerita, Lamar Dodd School of Art, Univ. of Georgia, December 2019.

Literary sources edited by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, Univ. of Georgia, January 2022

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