Theogonies and the Like (page 2)

Chapter 1: The Early Gods

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Titanomachia, Fr 1 – Poetae Epici Graeci, vol. 1, p. 11, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

In some authors, all things are said to be from Night and Tartaros, but in others from Hades and Aither (Air). The one that wrote the Titanomachia says that they are all from Aither (Air). (trans. William Evans)

Titanomachia, Fr 2 – Poetae Epici Graeci, vol. 1, p. 12, ed. A. Bernabé, Leipzig 1987.

Aither (Air) is the son of Ouranos as the one who wrote the Titanomachia says. (trans. William Evans)

Titanomachia, Fragment 8 – Poetae Epici Graeci, vol. 1, p. 14, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

Titanomachia, Fragment 3 – Poetae Epici Graeci, vol. 1, p. 12, ed. A. Bernabé. Leipzig 1987.

Eumolpia ascribed to Mousaios, 2B14 – Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker 1, p. 25, ed. H. Diels and W. Kranz. 6th ed. Berlin 1951.

ApB 1.1-2Apollodoros, Bibliotheke (Library)

Sky was the first who ruled over the whole world. And having wedded Earth, he begat first the Hundred-handed, as they are named: Briareus, Gyes, Cottus, who were unsurpassed in size and might, each of them having a hundred hands and fifty heads. After these, Earth bore him the Cyclopes, to wit, Arges, Steropes, Brontes, of whom each had one eye on his forehead. But them Sky bound and cast into Tartarus, a gloomy place in Hades as far distant from earth as earth is distant from the sky. Greek Text

Updated by Elena Bianchelli, Senior Lecturer of Classical Languages and Culture, University of Georgia, June 2020

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